Patient Sarah Cramer is expecting her fourth child, but it’s her first pregnancy under midwifery care. Certified nurse-midwife Janet B. Goff, of Greenwood’s Birth Connection, uses a Doppler ultrasound device to listen to the heartbeat of Cramer’s baby. Goff is the first CNM to be practicing at Self Regional Medical Center and she is currently the only CNM in the Greenwood area.
(St. Claire Donaghy | Index-Journal)
Patient Sarah Cramer is expecting her fourth child, but it’s her first pregnancy under midwifery care. Certified nurse-midwife Janet B. Goff, of Greenwood’s Birth Connection, uses a Doppler ultrasound device to listen to the heartbeat of Cramer’s baby. Goff is the first CNM to be practicing at Self Regional Medical Center and she is currently the only CNM in the Greenwood area. (St. Claire Donaghy | Index-Journal)
Janet B. Goff is the first certified nurse-midwife to be practicing at Self Regional Medical Center and she is the only one in the Greenwood area.
Goff’s practice, Birth Connection at 107 Venture Court, provides a full range of primary health care to women from adolescence to after menopause, including gynecological check-ups, family planning services, preconception care, prenatal and post-partum care and annual exams. Most health insurance covers care by certified nurse-midwives, Goff said.


Goff shares office space with obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Michael B. Gentry, who is her primary physician back-up, a requirement for certified nurse-midwives.
“I’ve wanted to add childbirth options for the community,” Gentry said. “I know Janet and her capabilities. Many of us in Self Regional’s obstetrics department have worked with Janet for many years as a labor and delivery nurse. Having her on board as a certified nurse-midwife brings a service to the community not previously offered. It helps me as well to have another person in my office to handle calls.”
When he completed medical school in 1990, Gentry said certified nurse-midwives were commonly practicing in hospitals in the Midwest, noting they have been around for years, just not widely so in this part of South Carolina, or the South in general.

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