Greenwood City Council members, from left, Kenn Wiltshire, Mayor Welborn Adams and Betty Boles, listen to information Monday night during council’s work session. (Chris Trainor | Index-Journal)
Greenwood City Council members, from left, Kenn Wiltshire, Mayor Welborn Adams and Betty Boles, listen to information Monday night during council’s work session. (Chris Trainor | Index-Journal)
A week ago, city leaders indicated a controversial ordinance commonly referred to as “stop-and-identify” would likely not proceed.
On Monday night -- after some discussion -- Greenwood City Council made it official. The ordinance is, at least for now, dead.
City Council initially passed first reading on the stop-and-identify ordinance -- which would require residents to provide their name, address and date of birth to police officers in certain scenarios -- on May 19, by a count of 5-2. Councilwomen Betty Boles and Linda Edwards cast the dissenting votes.
However, council quickly faced a wave of backlash from the public about the ordinance, including a torrent of criticism on social media and Internet comment sections. Mayor Welborn Adams said he got more phone calls on the stop-and-identify ordinance than any other issue in several years.
On Monday, city manager Charlie Barrineau asked council if it wanted to proceed to a second reading of the ordinance, considering the vociferous backlash.


“As you know, after the (Index-Journal) article (about stop-and-identify) came out, we received a lot of feedback,” Barrineau said. “At least I know I did. We saw a lot of feedback on social media. ... I didn’t feel like we were ready, based on that feedback and discussions with (council members), to schedule a public hearing and second reading at this point.”

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