With no intention of casting aspersions on any elected officials, we take note of the fact that in several local elections, the incumbents are most likely handily returning to office.
In Greenwood, the mayor and two members of council are thus far unopposed. Officially. We doubt at this point anyone will step up and file as a write-in candidate, but it could happen. Only one council seat, that of Ronnie Ables, is facing opposition this November as challenger Keith McCaslan announced early on his intention to run.
In Greenwood School District 50, board members LeVerne Fuller, James Williams and chairman Shell Dula are unopposed. And the seat vacated in June by Brad Thompson garnered the interest of only one candidate, Michael Gaskin.
In McCormick County’s school board election, it’s much the same story. Three incumbents and a newcomer filed for election. The three garnering the most votes will be elected, and in Saluda County’s school board election, thus far three candidates are running unopposed but could also face write-in opposition. But again, don’t count on that.


The story is a bit different in Abbeville, however, where five school board seats are up for election in November. Two incumbents face opposition and a number of other candidates have filed for other seats being vacated. Interest there seems to run high.
Again, we are not casting aspersions on anyone and must readily acknowledge that perhaps -- with Abbeville being something of an anomaly here -- those who are being represented are quite satisfied with their representatives. But the election will come and go in November, and we suspect the complainers will remain strong and vocal. So where are these vocal people come filing time? If they are not satisfied with how the city or schools are being run, why have they not stepped forward and announced their intention to seek office and work to right all they see that is wrong?
Apathy’s current is swift, its waters run deep. We are constantly amazed and equally dismayed at the lack of participation in our elections. Voter turnout frequently is low. And, as seen by the lack of challengers in a good many area races, the interest in serving is low as well.
When all is said and done, when in November the ballots are counted (where actual voting is necessary, since some are elected by virtue of there being no competition) and the people take office, we remind folks to limit their complaints -- perhaps refrain from complaining altogether. This is especially aimed at those who complain the loudest and most frequently.
Got better ideas? Better solutions? Great. Bring them to the voters by putting yourself up for candidacy. We’re not saying put up or shut up, but we’re awful close.